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Frank Sterle Jr. • 1 year ago

Revealed in a Common Ground magazine article (“BC’s LNG industry – flogging a dead horse,” posted Dec. 8, 2018) is that Coastal GasLink’s liquefied fractured gas project is overall a bad deal for both British Columbians and the environment. The following facts, which I’ve yet to hear reported in the mainstream news-media, left me astonished and angry:
--The LNG company will not pay any provincial sales tax on the gas they extract/purchase.
--It will receive subsidized electricity rates, at 6 cents/ kilowatt-hour, while residential customers pay double that (even though the LNG industry is not a labour-intensive industry, for which the 6-cent rate was initially formulated.
--It will pay no LNG royalty tax, and 9 percent corporate tax rate on future profits, if they’re declared in B.C.
--Royalty taxes are paid to resource owners, in this LNG case to B.C.ers. Much of the industry is financially structured to transfer profits to jurisdictions with lower tax regimes, as Australia has unpleasantly learned.
--It pays only a maximum $35 per ton of carbon and zero for its vented and leaked (a.k.a. “fugitive”) gases. The public, however, will pay significantly higher carbon taxes, as this is increased in later years to control worsening planetary climate change. “Fugitive emissions, when fully and accurately accounted for, make LNG a worse climate-warmer than coal”. …

def • 1 year ago

Check the link for a recent study claiming that industry sources of methane are up to 40%understated.
https://www.commondreams.or...

RickW • 1 year ago

In keeping with your post:
https://www.focusonvictoria...
While political leaders exude enthusiasm, some large firms involved seem to be looking for the exits

Jan Steinman • 1 year ago
large firms involved seem to be looking for the exits

Yea, like when the EndRun descendant couldn't sell TMX until they found a sucker big enough.

RickW • 1 year ago

I wonder if such examples are a case of "write the damn cheque! It's not my money."

Frank Sterle Jr. • 1 year ago

.... Also revealed in a Common Ground magazine article:
--Besides reduced property assessments and taxes, it receives $120 million a year towards infrastructure expenses, such as building roads, pipelines and powering fracking equipment. “When this is factored into the skimpy returns to the public purse, the fracked gas industry remits less to BC’s coffers than do parking fees and fines in the City of Vancouver”.
--Unfortunately for those already drooling over a perceived creation of a bunch of Canadian jobs, Coastal GasLink receives relaxed Temporary Foreign Worker rules, thus allowing it to import labourers. “Unlike Australia, Canada has not negotiated local employment guarantees for the construction and operation of LNG facilities and pipelines”.
--It’s exempt from the 25% import duty on machinery and equipment. “The industry is also appealing a ruling by Canadian International Trade Tribunal imposing a hefty anti-dumping tariff on LNG modules constructed in Korea and floated here for final assembly. Constructing these units abroad denies jobs to Canadian steelworkers and revenue to Canada”.
--It receives accelerated capital cost write-downs. “The Harper Government hiked the speed at which the LNG industry could write off its huge capital costs (to 30 percent per annum, previously 8 percent), effectively delaying income taxes and reducing borrowing costs for the industry.”
https://commonground.ca/bcs...
(Frank Sterle Jr.)

Sadie-Kay • 1 year ago

This is maddening! 😡

Brian Bruise • 1 year ago

I have just sent this email to the BC and National NDP offices and will be giving it wider circulation among my political friends and other interested parties:

To whom it may concern:

I am a long-time supporter of Native rights, going back so far as the sixties when young white activists like me supported a militant wing of that struggle, the Native Alliance for Red Power, when it was formed. They were raising grievances similar to those raised by Louis Riel and Chief Poundmaker in 1885 - namely that Canada was not protecting their rights, their land and their survival as a distinct people. Now, 135 years after the battles at Duck Lake and Cut Knife, these core unresolved issues are at the heart of every other contemporary battle, be it for clean water, housing, education, social services, etc.

I am writing today to point out some serious problems with the resolution of the current impasse:

- the Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs (the "Chiefs") do not have any authority and/or control over many of the individuals or small groups throwing up some of the blockades;
- there is a small cohort of activists across Canada who have latched on to all manner of other demonstrations on other issues (Toronto G20, anti-war demos, on university campuses and so on) who are what I describe as anarcho-nihilists.
usually under the banner of the Black Bloc, they are intent on attacking and provoking the status quo by actions as benign as using graffiti to smashing windows and setting police cars afire and, in the result, drawing attention away for the legitimate demands of the thousands of peaceful protesters fighting for various causes.
- their numbers are few, but their dedication (and sometimes fanaticism) is driven by an intractable frustration with how adept the political defenders of the status quo have been at maintaining it - the current Liberal government being a case in point.
- It would be perfectly understandable if some young native men and women were drawn to this philosophy and form of protest.
- the first blockades in support of the Chiefs' demands were on Mohawk territory and maintained by savvy Mohawk activists and had valid symbolic value, including in the eyes of the broader, initially supportive or neutral public.
- some subsequent blockades after the initial street demonstrations in support, have been set up on roads and commuter corridors and have certainly gained peoples attention, but have in the main managed to piss off hundreds of thousands of ordinary Canadians travelling to and from work.
- the often tepid support or neutrality among the general public is being eroded daily; sadly but understandable given the general public's rather shallow understanding of the legal issues at stake around unceded territory (in Delgamuukw and Calder, for example).
- more glaring and upsetting is that the current battle has brought to the surface the deep-seated undercurrent of racism in Canadian society where we can abhor the conditions under which they live, but find it upsetting when they actually try to do something about it - aside from Andrew Scheer, just read the commentariat on various mainstream news sites in this regard.
- I'm not sure how wily the Liberal strategists are, but it looks like lying doggo for a couple of weeks was a calculated strategy so that public opinion would turn against the Chiefs.
- as I type, at 3:20 p.m. today, February 21st. Trudeau is now bringing down the hammer in the name of acting for all Canadians. The barricades must come down! followed by yadda, yadda, his usual stream of platitudes.
- despite the expedient and false notion that the politicians had no control over the various police forces involved, we are now seeing the reality.
- this announcement today is a wet dream for both the baying Con rednecks and their supporters and the anarcho-nihilists, part of whose raison d'etre is to provoke the iron heel of the state in hopes of sparking a wider revolt - that is indeed a dream.
- supporters of the goals our indigenous peoples have been seeking, well before and after the Northwest Rebellion, might soon see further response by sectors within that community which I would liken to the last battles of the Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes led by Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Chief Gall when not long after the victory at the Battle of the Greasy Grass, they could see that their way of life was doomed by the overwhelming force of numbers of white westward settlement and the end of an open prairie and the buffalo herds which sustained them.

The BC NDP government must take some responsibility for any future outcome for not immediately backing the alternate pipeline route put forward by the Chiefs with any legal or regulatory powers at its disposal. A CBC article on its online news site basically soft-soaped Coastal GasLink's rationale for denying a route change, ending with these quotes:

"The route that has been selected reflects the best engineering, environmental, cultural and ECONOMICALLY FEASIBLE criteria possible" Coastal GasLink said in an emailed statement to CBC.

"There is no route available to CGL that would avoid traditional Wet'suwet'en territory.… To change the route to avoid Wet'suwet'en territory at this date would require major environmental assessment work, which would not be feasible under the timelines to which we have committed."

I have highlighted what anyone with critical thought processes would view as the paramount consideration of this company.

The second paragraph above is complete disingenuous. The article itself to which they responded points out the alternative route favoured by the Chiefs did not require CGL to avoid Wet'suwet'en territory.

Here is a link to the article so anyone can see the discussion for themselves.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/can...

Shame on the entirety of Canada's political elite from the reactionary Conservatives to the "liberal" Liberals to Notley's NDP in Alberta and the BC NDP all of whom have been ignoring the existential threat of continued development and use of fossil fuels across the world. In that regard they are all pushing the mythology of ecologically benign natural gas while ignoring the warnings of the Union of Concerned Scientists that while emissions are much lower when burned than coal and oil, we must also take into account the aggregate amount of CO2 produced and, more important the methane released, from its source deep in the ground, through extraction and delivery to the site where it is burned. Informed Canadians should be demanding the cancelling of this project, not merely re-routing it.

Whatever the outcome following today, it is on the heads of the professional politicians, their corporate friends, their mainstream media enablers and the gullible general public who fall for the narrative that defends the status quo and demonizes anyone who represents a serious threat to it.

Brian Waite
Vancouver, BC

Doug • 1 year ago
Coastal GasLink is building a work camp to house up to 400 people in the area. Transient workers housed in “man camps” are a major concern, according to the missing women’s report, as high-paying, high-stress jobs contribute to an increase in drug and alcohol abuse, sexual assaults and domestic violence.

Let's not kid ourselves, some of the RCMP personnel also pose a threat to First Nations women.

Female RCMP members themselves have been subjected to chronic sexual harassment and assault from male members of the force.

You know you have a very serious problem when victims are awarded not one but two $100 million settlements.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/can...

There have also been serious accusations of sexual assault by RCMP members on First Nations women in BC.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/can...

The RCMP says it wants to get to the bottom of abuse allegations against its officers in British Columbia involving aboriginal women and girls, but says individuals making the claims must come forward to allow police to conduct a proper investigation.

Those comments followed the release Wednesday of a report by New York-based Human Rights Watch detailing the claims — which include police threats, torture and sexual assault. The report calls on the federal government to launch a national inquiry.

The RCMP aren't acting as police in this affair, they are acting as an occupying army in the interests of the LNG consortium that isn't even based in Canada let alone BC.

Intimidation, tight control of movement and even assault are all part of tactics used by occupying armies to quell resistance. So is sexual assault. Look at the photos of the RCMP personnel there, would you feel safe when people armed and armored for war were occupying your home.

R Langley • 1 year ago

"The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission said it is awaiting a response from RCMP before making final recommendations on the Kent County complaint. It concludes its letter by suggesting the BCCLA’s submission be investigated by the RCMP and if the association is dissatisfied with the result, that the commission could then conduct an independent review."
Why on earth would their be a need for the BCCLA to ask the RCMP to investigate? And why is the Commission prepared to wait 7 years for an interim report? This is incredibly disturbing on many fronts and should cause all Canadians to be embarrassed and ashamed of our national police force. This commission is undermining the integrity of every RCMP officer, the majority of whom I am sure are upstanding ethical people, by allowing such unacceptably long investigations into serious allegations of abuse of power, abuses that appear to be continuing during said investigation. What is the point of having what is clearly an inept commission? If they have no teeth then why haven't they publically resigned to bring attention to this disgraceful behavior? Our police force, our citizens the Indigenous peoples of Canada deserve much much better than this. It is quite obvious that our National Police force and the Commission need an over haul. But who will do it?

Mikey • 1 year ago

If democracy and accountability are ever to see the light of day in Canada, the creation and operation of 'commissions' MUST be restructured to put the power into the hands of people who WILL tell the truth, and tell it reasonably quickly. Make it all public. No non-disclosure agreements, no secret editing and private discussions.... RCMP management need some firings/fines/ prison time to remind them of their actual history.

def • 1 year ago

Thank you AFH you are performing an essential service. Keep the information coming. It becomes clearer that the RCMP, CGL and the Provincial and Federal governments have no clothes.
I don't know for certain, but I think there is a very high probability that many communities in B.C. are witnessing increasing frequency of support for the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs and the environment. No necessarily blockades but just groups of people publicly expressing the sentiment that we are way past 'enough is enough' we will act in solidarity with others in bringing it to an end.
Solidarity

Anne__Ominous • 1 year ago

So the RCMP feels free to ignore the "rule of law".

Sadie-Kay • 1 year ago

I'm glad the Wetsuweten people have hung those red dresses everywhere in plain sight. This addresses the other yet unresolved problems, which the RCMP, CGL, and mancamps would only aggravate. Namely, the missing and murdered women of the nation. Coastal GasLink is building a work camp to house up to 400 foreign workers in the area. Transient workers housed in “man camps” are a major concern, according to the missing women’s report, resulting in
increased drug and alcohol abuse, sexual assaults, and domestic violence. 😡

windship • 1 year ago

I think what keeps coming back to haunt me in terms of how Ottawa currently treats indigenous self-government, is how they positively cheerleaded a radical and violent right wing military coup that just took over Bolivia by gunpoint, forcing Evo Morales, a popular and democratically-elected aboriginal president, to flee to Mexico just to save the lives of his elected government members.

Shame on Canada for being on the wrong side of history!

Combine this nastiness with Canada's rancid leadership in the Lima Group, supporting the crippling economic sanctions imposed by the US Empire that are making the poor indigenous populations of Venezuela suffer immense hardship, all the while pretending the problem is with an "evil dictator".

Again, Canadians should realize that Nicolás Maduro actually won the popular vote in the last election, fair and square. This is something that even the clown king Trump cannot brag about, although the corrupted US electoral system is almost beyond repair.

Magnus Laude • 1 year ago

More trifling sums of misery to add to the foot of the account.

Canada opposed Iranian democracy
https://yvesengler.com/2020...
In 1953 the US and Britain overthrew Iran’s first popularly elected prime minister, Mohammad Mossadegh and Ottawa played a small part in this destruction of Iranian democracy.

Canada’s role in the Other 9/11
http://www.coldtype.net/Ass...
...on September 11 1973, the democratically elected presi­dent of Chile, Salvador Allende, was over­thrown by General Augusto Pinochet.

Diplomatic support for Pinochet led to econom­ic assistance. Just after the coup Canada voted for a $22-million ($100-million in today’s money) Inter American Development Bank loan “rushed through the bank with embarrassing haste”.

The word they won’t use to describe Canada’s role in Haiti
https://yvesengler.com/2019...
...protesters threw rocks at the Canadian Embassy and demonstrators have repeatedly speechified against Canadian “imperialism”.

Solidarity activists should highlight Haitians’ rejection of 16 years of Canadian disregard for their democratic rights.

Canadian imperialism in Haiti in the spotlight
https://yvesengler.com/2019...

Liberals use RCMP in attempt to silence critics of their foreign policy
https://yvesengler.com/2019...
The visits are a transparent effort to intimidate me from directly challenging the government’s pro-corporate and pro-empire international policies.

Remembering the truth about Lester Pearson
https://yvesengler.com/2017...
There is even a case to be made that the former external minister and prime minister could be posthumously tried for war crimes.

Jan Steinman • 1 year ago

All such things — and many more, especially recent actions — indicate that Canada should not be seated on the UN Security Council.

I don't have time to craft such a campaign, although I'll be a cheerleader. Wanna volunteer, Magnus Laude?

As a start, write a brief, but concise statement, and set up a web petition.

Magnus Laude • 1 year ago

I've given up writing to bureaucrats I no longer have the temperament to stomach their co-ordinated systematized non-responsiveness.
But as you may witness I haven't given up on ranting.

If I were ever to by some fantasy become four year king of Canada an early action would be to hire super excellent extremely well paid body guards to protect me from violent wrath for doing such things as pull Canuckistan out of NATO and the UN.

Tax big oil the way Norway does, stop all election funding by any entity that isn't a registered voter. Get rid of the governor general and the lieutenant governor generals.
Remove section 46 (a) from the CCC:
https://laws-lois.justice.g...
This place can not be a democracy as long as it is a constitutional monarchy. What utter claptrap!

Get rid of the deity part in the Constitution Act (1982):
https://laws-lois.justice.g...
...Canada is founded upon principles that recognize the supremacy of God...

Dissolve all so-called free trade agreements:
Sovereignty is the full right and power of a governing body over itself, without any interference from outside sources or bodies.
Investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) is corruption writ large.
Politician's Promises Not Set in stone, Court says
https://www.theglobeandmail...

Further restore Canuckistans sovereignty by once again having the BoC provide loans to the government under the authority of the BoC Act section 18 (i) (j) as was done between 1938 and 1974:
https://laws-lois.justice.g...
Plus take away the private bankster's privilege to do this and if they do they be charged with CCC section 449:
https://laws-lois.justice.g...

Outlaw the Tweedledee Tweedledum corporate parties A and B because of their 152 year non-stop undemocratic dictatorship.

Cancel the pipeline purchase, get rid of the corrupt RCMP and bring in special tax laws against any entity in Canada with offshore tax haven accounts.

This too would become past tense:
https://electronicintifada....

Come to think of it, the Frazer Institute and their ilk would also need to be squared away.

No-one but no-one could become a lobbyist or be employed as an entity director within ten years after having a ministerial portfolio such as this scumf*ck did:
https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/...

Deport Conrad Black and his broad out of the country.

A JFK Style Outcome Prediction
I'd probably be executed by the mucky mucks' hit persons within 7 days of taking public office notwithstanding my highly paid black belt poly-para-phenelyne-terephthalamide jacketed body guards.

End of Maniacal Fantasy Rant

Alan MacKinnon • 1 year ago

Political profit, corporate profit but no public profit. But this atricle is about the abuse of the public trust. All of us along with our first nations brothers have lost faith in the RCMP, the politicians and the governing bodies that should be able to protect all of our rights as citezens. That is what underlies all of the protests. Should we really push for change we can get ourselves yet another lot of self serving politicians to shape and bend the laws to their own profits.

R Langley • 1 year ago

Truly frightening Alan. This frustration that many of us are feeling is exactly what got Trump elected....so yes I hear you re your last sentence. It makes me wonder what we can do? I feel for the good men and women in our Police forces, Governments and Institutes who know their concerns will not be heard or acted upon in a positive manner and as a result are not raised for realistic fears of retaliation. We are at real risk of continuing down a very scary slope. And this is all the more frustrating when there are so many positive and exciting things that Canadians could be doing to turn this mess around.

phodgson • 1 year ago

Canadians could have turned this around last October, Tweedle dee Tweedle dum, 155 years and counting of injustice. Liberals Progressive, give me a break.

Mikey • 1 year ago

Whether effective or not, contact your politicians and tell them to get the RCMP, CGL out, get the trains running, start negotiations. Just think, the RCMP and CGL could have had the trains running days ago but chose to put fuel on the fire. The extremist ideology of state enforced, extractive capitalism continues its colonial ways, oblivious to the incendiary nature of the moment, and violently claiming democratic justice.

Magnus Laude • 1 year ago

Corporate Scumf*ck Monster BB
Wickham expressed skepticism about Public Safety Minister Bill Blair’s announcement today that RCMPsychopaths will leave the area if...

Qui cum canibus concumbunt cum pulicibus surgent
...Blair...faced criticism from all sides for his handling of the infamous G20 summit, held in Toronto in June 2010. ...Police, under Blair’s leadership, conducted random street checks, detained more than 1,000 protesters for up to 24 hours in make-shift camps, used arbitrary strip searches, amongst other Charter violations. Blair also continued, and defended, the practise of demanding identification from otherwise law-abiding, predominantly non-white, Torontonians as well...
https://www.vice.com/en_ca/...

If You Travel Don't Wear a Maple Leaf Icon
[The disgraceful Canuckistan] ...government tolerates undemocratic actions...including the recent military coup in Bolivia directed against the indigenous people of that country...
https://www.counterpunch.or...

mooney7 • 1 year ago

As the person most responsible for the egregious violations of Canadian's civil rights that happened at the G20, Bill Blair should be in jail.

Haywood • 1 year ago

And don't forget the High River debacle, of which the RCMP have never given a response IIRC
https://nationalpost.com/ne...

Magnus Laude • 1 year ago

Decades ago I saw a movie about Ma Barker and she said: "Hangins too good for 'em."
Paraphrasing Ma:
"Jail's too good for 'em."

RickW • 1 year ago

Throw him under an assault vehicle?
https://www.cbc.ca/news/pol...

Magnus Laude • 1 year ago

The tire tread prints adorning his flattened body might even be cheerfully described as a bold fashion statement.

RickW • 1 year ago

Could be the Saudis' hand in this. Their machines, their tiff:
https://www.theglobeandmail...

Trish Paterson • 1 year ago

With the return of protests to the popular news we hear the return of a popular myth, the myth of passivism. Protests are fine, so long as they are not disruptive; these protesters aren’t like the good ones who hold signs in some cordoned off part of an alley.

Disruptive and violent protests are used interchangeably; they shouldn’t be. Protest can be disruptive without being violent.

Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Mandela were all fighting for human rights. Gandhi, specifically, fighting against colonialism.

During the famous Salt March of the Indian independence movement rails and railways were blocked during the protest.

Should Gandhi have focused on something less disruptive?

During the march on Selma, the protestors blocked the Edmund Pettus Bridge, the police response lives in infamy, attacking the protesters with dogs and breaking heads with batons.

Were the Selma police just upholding “law and order”?

On February 1, 1965 Martin Luther King and Ralph Abernathy refused to cooperate with Chief Baker's traffic directions on the way to the courthouse. Friends of SNCC chapters staged sit-ins at federal buildings in support of Selma black.

Was insufficient attention paid to inconvenienced federal workers?

On June 17, 1992, The African National Congress began an open-ended campaign of public protest with a day of rallies, work stoppages and threats of a crippling general strike by the summer's end if the white minority Government did not move more quickly to give Black people's voting rights.

Should these protesters have been more concerned about how this would affect employers?

By cordoning off and sanitizing protest we degrade the acts of the past as criminality. We fail to recognize the need for sometimes painful disruption to draw attention to much greater ills.

Towards this end should we not all consider the purpose of protest rather than rushing to denounce protestors as radicals or criminals?

The United Nations is urging Canada to suspend work on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, Site C dam and Coastal GasLink pipeline. The Wet'setwet'en people have little power, except the power of protest to stop it.

Jan Steinman • 1 year ago

Thanks for this, Trish!

"Get to the back of the bus, Rosa Parks! You're 'inconveniencing' the white folk!"

Darren MacKay • 1 year ago

Just this Week I was Banned from Posting on Facebook, TWICE- For Days Each Time...and my Posts Removed.

One Such Post Reads:

The Biggest Problems with the RCMP is When they take and Oath - They are to the Queen / Crown/ and of course SECRECY..
NOT The People

"When an RCMP constable is sworn in, he or she takes a three part oath:

Oath of Allegiance: "Do you solemnly swear that you will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Canada, her heirs and successors according to the law, so help you God?"

Oath of Office: "Do you solemnly swear that you will faithfully, diligently and impartially execute and perform the duties required of you as a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and will well and truly obey and perform all lawful orders and instructions that you receive, without fear, favor or affection of or towards any person, so help you God?"

Oath of Secrecy: "Do you solemnly swear that you will keep absolutely secret all knowledge and information of which you may become possessed through your position with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; that you will not, without due authority in that behalf, discuss with members of the Force, or any other person, either by word or by letter, any matter which may come to your notice through your employment with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, so help you God?"

To each of these questions, the response is: "I do so swear."
https://dues-research.livej...

Tweedie • 1 year ago

What did women do to get the vote, what did AIDS activists do to get funding for AIDS research, what did activists do when they wanted to test nuclear bombs, what did they do to stop the Vietnam war. Inconvenience is a small price to pay for a saner and safer world.

RickW • 1 year ago

Trudeau today (21st) said the barricades must come down, because (anecdotally): Despite those efforts...... every attempt at dialogue with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs behind the initial protest has failed to deliver a resolution, because the pre-ordained outcome (praeexistunt effectus ordinatos) has not been agreed upon.

Darren MacKay • 1 year ago

indiginous vs. Non Indiginous

Sickens me to know each year People are Losing their Homes because they Cannot Pay the Property Taxes.

Unlike the Indigenous People, Fighting for "Their" Land (Given Tax Exemptions, Fishing and Hunting Rights, etc etc..)

Many don't think of Non Indigenous People... that Pay Taxes on the Land - They Cannot Own - and if they Don't Pay their Taxes - THEIR Home is Sold off for TAXES. Hard Earned Money and Labor they have Spent their Whole Life to Get...to Make a Home and Place to Live - On a Pillar of Sand.

Like the Indigenous People - Non Indigenous People are as Much- Victims of Our Government.

Like a Bunch Ants- WE All Work for the Queen and Crown!

“Queen Elizabeth II the largest landowner on Earth.”

"Queen Elizabeth II, head of state of the United Kingdom and of 31 other states and territories, is the legal owner of about 6,600 million acres of land, one sixth of the earth’s non ocean surface.

She is the only person on earth who owns whole countries, and who owns countries that are not her own domestic territory. This land ownership is separate from her role as head of state and is different from other monarchies where no such claim is made – Norway, Belgium, Denmark etc.

The value of her land holding. £17,600,000,000,000 (approx).
This makes her the richest individual on earth. "

How Canada is owned

"All physical land in Canada is the property of the Crown, Queen Elisabeth 11. There is no provision in the Canada Act, or in the Constitution Act 1982 which amends it, for any Canadian to own any physical land in Canada. All that Canadians may hold, in conformity with medieval and feudal law, is “an interest in an estate in land in fee simple”. Land defined as ‘Crown land’ in Canada, and administered by the Federal Government and the Provinces, is merely land not ‘dedicated’ or assigned in freehold tenure. Freehold is tenure, not ownership. Freehold land is ‘held’ not ‘owned’."
http://www.whoownstheworld....

Magnus Laude • 1 year ago

More trifling sums of misery to add to the foot of the account.

Canada opposed Iranian democracy
https://yvesengler.com/2020...
In 1953 the US and Britain overthrew Iran’s first popularly elected prime minister, Mohammad Mossadegh and Ottawa played a small part in this destruction of Iranian democracy.

Canada’s role in the Other 9/11
http://www.coldtype.net/Ass...
...on September 11 1973, the democratically elected presi­dent of Chile, Salvador Allende, was over­thrown by General Augusto Pinochet.

Diplomatic support for Pinochet led to econom­ic assistance. Just after the coup Canada voted for a $22-million ($100-million in today’s money) Inter American Development Bank loan “rushed through the bank with embarrassing haste”.

The word they won’t use to describe Canada’s role in Haiti
https://yvesengler.com/2019...
...protesters threw rocks at the Canadian Embassy and demonstrators have repeatedly speechified against Canadian “imperialism”.

Solidarity activists should highlight Haitians’ rejection of 16 years of Canadian disregard for their democratic rights.

Canadian imperialism in Haiti in the spotlight
https://yvesengler.com/2019...

Liberals use RCMP in attempt to silence critics of their foreign policy
https://yvesengler.com/2019...
The visits are a transparent effort to intimidate me from directly challenging the government’s pro-corporate and pro-empire international policies.

Remembering the truth about Lester Pearson
https://yvesengler.com/2017...
There is even a case to be made that the former external minister and prime minister could be posthumously tried for war crimes.

Canuckistan is a constitutional monarchy and monarchy is the antithesis of democracy.
The Canuck Senate was based on the UK's House of Lords neither
body is elected they are appointed by Queenie or her appointed representatives, yet they get to over ride or alter the people's elected representatives tabled legislation.

Civil servants are the Queen's employees NOT the taxpayer's employees.
If a citizen commences a proceeding and names the federal government as a defendant the first defendant listed in the style of cause is: Her Majesty the Queen.

In the Criminal Code of Canada we find this:
High treason
46
(1) Every one commits high treason who, in Canada,
(a) kills or attempts to kill Her Majesty, or does her any bodily harm tending to death or destruction, maims or wounds her, or imprisons or restrains her...
https://laws-lois.justice.g...

RickW • 1 year ago

I see some of my posts are apparently sitting in limbo - and with little logic to which ones are Yea and which are Nay......

Bill • 1 year ago

After you find and then see that both TMX and BC LNG are fiscally irresponsible, follow the money….. you notice this needle #26 (CAPITALS below) in the UNDRIP haystack.
It appears that our governments should read what they have been printing lately.
From near end of #5 UNDRIP in Tyee

https://thetyee.ca/News/202...
RCMP raids on Wet’suwet’en territory, according to some who occupied the steps of the B.C. legislature recently, appear to directly violate at least one of UNDRIP’s 46 articles. They point to Article 8 which declares, “States shall provide effective mechanisms for prevention of, and redress” for any action “which has the aim or effect of dispossessing them of their lands, territories or resources” and any “form of forced population transfer which has the aim or effect of violating or undermining any of their rights.”
Article 18 gives the Wet’suwet’en the right to participate in any decision-making through their own procedures and law. This has not happened. Article 26 gives them the right to own, use, develop and control the lands, territories and resources they possess through ownership, and says the STATE MUST give legal recognition and PROTECT their lands and resources. None of this has occurred to date, and it doesn’t look like B.C. is even considering it.
The RCMP must do an about turn and defend the Wet’suwet’en from Coastal GasLink.

Jan Steinman • 1 year ago

I don't disagree with you, but you do know what the BC Government says about that, don't you?

Bill 41, the United Nations Resolution on the Rights of Indigenous People Act, is a plan for coming up with a plan for aligning the laws of BC with UNDRIP. It is full of future-tense verbs. On the Governments web page for UNDRIPA, it says it "aims to create a path forward" that "sets out a process to align B.C.’s laws with the UN Declaration."

So there is a lot of wiggle-room in there. The Government claims that, since the whole fracked gas boondoggle started before Bill 41 was passed, it shouldn't apply.

Jan Steinman • 1 year ago
she did not want to launch an investigation that might further delay the RCMP’s response to the commission’s report on a similar complaint

Looks like the RCMP hit the jackpot!

"Hey, if we screw around long enough, we can use that screw-up to get out of other screw-ups!"

I'm glad to hear Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond's voice. She did an outstanding job as BC's Representative for Children and Youth, in a government that many would describe as being at war with children and youth.

Darren MacKay • 1 year ago

Hard to get a comment in here with an Objective Opinion without Censorship.